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At Books to Benefit, we work to keep our Facebook page up-to-date with photos, comments from volunteers and timely information. Visit us often to learn about our upcoming events, donation hours and future sales.

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TAKE STOCK THURSDAY: Functional medicine is a form of alternative medicine which focuses on interactions between the environment and the gastrointestinal, endocrine, and immune systems. Physicians in functional medicine understand the connection between nutrition and optimum health.

Harvard medical doctor Andrew Weil is broadly described "guru" of the alternative medical brands: holistic health and integrative medicine, whose names also constitute an emerging brand of healthcare services and products in these fields. His book “8 Weeks to Optimum Health: A Proven Program for Taking Full Advantage of Your Body's Natural Healing Power” offers the most up-to-date findings on such vital subjects as cholesterol, antioxidants, trans fats, toxic residues in the food supply, soy products, and vitamins and supplements, together with a greatly enhanced source list of information and supplies.

“Prescription for Nutritional Healing” by Balch and Balch is a must-have resource for drug-free natural remedies, including vitamins, minerals, herbs and food supplements.

Both of these books may be found at the November 2-5 sale so mark your calendars.
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WORLD VIEW WEDNESDAY: Before we tell you about a fun donation we received, here's what some of our volunteers thought of when they first saw it: The Music Man, Prof. Harold Hill, singing about the dangers of pool tables and asking the listening parents if their sons were "buckling their knickerbockers below the knee" and memorizing jokes from "Captain Billy's 'Whiz Bang'” (gasps of horror from the parents!).

Did you know that “Capt'n Billy's Whiz Bang” was a real magazine? We sure didn't! A donation of 5 of them sent us to the Internet, where we learned that the “Whiz Bang" was "one of the most popular and notorious humor magazines of the 1920s" (www.mnopedia.org). It was notorious for its bawdy humor and "touched on such topics as the shortening of women's skirt lengths, bobbed hair, illegal alcohol, and speakeasies." (Ibid.)

Capt'n Billy was the nickname of William H. Fawcett, an Army captain in WWI. A "whiz bang" was a shell from WWI that was heard the instant before it landed and exploded (see www.thefreedictionary.com). Fawcett went into publishing after the war and founded Fawcett Publications in 1919 with the “Whiz Bang.” Even though the magazine's popularity eventually declined, Fawcett moved with the times and established a hugely successful line of magazines and books; CBS Publications bought Fawcett in 1977 (www.wikipedia.org).

Trivia—“The Music Man” was set in 1912, some 7 years before “Capt'n Billy's Whiz Bang” was first published (www.mnopedia.org).
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SEEKING FEEDBACK: B2B began a new series of posts two weeks ago. We would like to know what you think of these posts. Please take a few minutes to respond to our poll. http://bit.ly/2uObyOu ... See MoreSee Less

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MYSTERY MONDAY: Still looking for good mysteries? C J Box, he has a wonderful 18-book series involving Joe Pickett, a Wyoming game warden. Joe's character is complex and strives to do the right thing in both family and work matters. Not always successful, but you gotta love the effort!.

In order to do justice to the characterization of Joe Pickett, Box rode with a few game wardens in Wyoming. In 2001 after the completion of his research, he began writing the series and released the first book of the series, “Open Season.” The book opened to great reviews and won several prestigious awards, including the category of the “Best First Novel.” The stories are well written, descriptive and worth the read. To learn more visit www.cjboxbooklist.com/joe-pickett-series/
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SCIENCE FICTION/FANTASY SUNDAY: Science fiction stories often help shape the future. After all, who can dispute Gene Roddenberry’s influence on future technology? Did you know flip phones were inspired by Star Trek’s fictional communicators? In the 60s, wasn’t it absurd to think that an African American female would be the communications officer on a starship? Sometimes science fiction later becomes science fact.

The character of Doc Savage created in the 1930s and 40s was another who was ahead of his time. Savage, described as the “Man of Bronze” because of his tanned skin and impressive golden eyes, was a physical phenomenon and mental genius, mentored as a child by scientists and physical trainers specially chosen by his father.

Batman, with all his gadgets, has nothing on him. Stan Lee has credited Doc Savage as being the forerunner to modern superheroes. Savage was the original MacGyver, creating his own colorless, odorless knockout gas. He made his own bullets that did not penetrate the skin, yet left his victims unconscious without inflicting permanent damage. Savage was a pioneer in creating digital devices, long before the computer age. If you are looking for a new superhero, be sure to check on this series, created by publisher Henry W. Ralston and editor John L. Nanovic at Street & Smith Publications, with additional material contributed by the series' main writer, Lester Dent. With over 181 books in the series, no doubt you’ll find plenty of material to keep you entertained. In fact, there were more books written about Doc Savage than Sherlock Holmes and the Shadow combined.
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